How Do We Know What We Know? Epistemic Tensions in Social and Cultural Research on Gambling 1980-2000

About the Course:

This project seeks to answer the question, how do we know what we know about gambling? With reference to a systematic review of the gambling research literature that addresses social and cultural topics and issues, this paper explores the epistemic cultures that created and gave authority to knowledge about gambling presented in scholarly research published between 1980 and 2000. From small beginnings in the 1980s, scholarly research in this area exploded during the 1990s. The trend in gambling research is towards an increasingly narrow range of topics.

Journal/Publisher:

Journal of Gambling Issues

Publication Date:

July 2004, Issue 11

Author

Virginia M. McGowan

About the Author:

Virginia McGowan, (PhD in anthropology, University of Toronto), recently joined the staff of the Addictions Research Centre on Prince Edward Island (a division of the Research Branch, Correctional Service Canada) as Associate Director, External Research. Prior to this appointment, Virginia was associate professor and founding coordinator of the Addictions Counselling Program in the School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge. There, among other projects, she carried out ethnographic field research in Canada, Australia, and Aotearoa/New Zealand. Her numerous current responsibilities include a closer look at gambling among offender populations and implications for recidivism and successful reintegration.

Recommended For:

This course is recommended for health care professionals, especially addiction counselors, psychologists, mental health counselors, social workers, and nurses who seek knowledge about gambling research. It is appropriate for all levels of participants’ knowledge.

Course Objectives:

  1. Discuss the relationship of expert systems and epistemic cultures to gambling research.

  2. Explain key questions and findings from the gambling research of the 1980s.

  3. Describe gambling surveys and studies of the 1990s and discuss tensions in scholarly interest in gambling.

  4. Identify present and possible trajectories of gambling research.

Exam Questions

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